Perspectives

The implications of data privacy regulation and risk


In 2020, privacy finally became more of a hot-button issue. GDPR – or the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation – was passed and the deadline for implementation was in 2018. As with Y2K – remember that – there was a lot of last-minute scrambling to ensure compliance. Integrated Media Strategies assisted its clients with reaching compliance. While the common conception is that GDPR and privacy regulation is only about digital materials, the law deals with data generally and how it is handled.

In 2020, privacy finally became more of a hot-button issue. GDPR – or the European Union’s General Data Protection Regulation – was passed and the deadline for implementation was in 2018. As with Y2K – remember that – there was a lot of last-minute scrambling to ensure compliance. Integrated Media Strategies assisted its clients with reaching compliance. While the common conception is that GDPR and privacy regulation is only about digital materials, the law deals with data generally and how it is handled.

This extends to practices within organisations all the way to how paper records are stored and managed. In the US, despite California’s Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA), data and other online privacy regulation, is substantially looser than the standards imposed by GDPR.  Expect this to change.

One place where organizations may be able to get more bang for their buck is in how they are producing or procuring video. Video is an expensive medium and video services departments are often hard-pressed keeping up with the multiple demands they face.  

This is because more and more media-rich information is online, smartphones play video, and video is a key element in digital communications, social media, marketing and customer retention. Given this, it makes sense to evaluate how organizations' video services departments are meeting strategic communications needs - or not.